Water

Young boy drinking water.

Many people living in poverty lack access to water services for many essential activities: drinking, hygiene, farming, watering livestock and operating small businesses. Winrock addresses water issues through comprehensive programs targeting sustainable strategies for use and conservation within communities, watersheds and regions. Multiple-Use water Services (MUS) is an integrated, client-oriented approach that couples water service delivery with supporting programs in health, livelihoods and environment.

Winrock has played a key technical and knowledge transfer role in sustainable bioenergy development for more than two decades. Our experts in forestry, agriculture, clean energy, enterprise development, and governance create the interdisciplinary teams needed to ensure that bioenergy delivers sustainable outcomes.

Water system is handed over to villagers

A new water system in Mwiri and Rwinkwavu sectors of the Kayonza district, Rwanda, was officially inaugurated March 17 and will supply clean, safe water for approximately 30,000 people, in addition to several schools, health centers and a major District hospital. The system is expected to decrease water prices and villagers will now be able to access clean drinking water instead of the pond which they had previously shared with their cattle.

Winrock International’s work with smallholder farmers in Asia, Africa and Latin America focuses on improving productivity and incomes.

Fertilizer and manure containing phosphorus help crops grow, but when phosphorus runs off into surface water it can lead to algal blooms and dead zones, damaging water quality for people and wildlife. Current conservation programs aim to reduce water pollution, but do not quantify reductions or track water quality improvements.

We’ve got a better idea: reward farmers according to science-based outcomes. Download this infographic to learn more about how Pay for Performance works.

The Reducing Phosphorus Loads from Agriculture project is piloting an innovative approach to reducing phosphorus loss from agricultural land by providing flexible, performance-based incentives that benefit both farmers and the environment. This project factsheet contains more information about the project.

The Reducing Phosphorus Loads from Agriculture project will pilot an innovative approach to reducing phosphorus loss from agricultural land by providing flexible, performance-based incentives to benefit both farmers and the environment. The focus of the project is the West Branch of the Milwaukee River, a 58 square-mile watershed in Wisconsin, where approximately 75 percent of land is used for agriculture.

Under the West Africa Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Initiative, Winrock’s proven Multiple-Use water Services (MUS) approach is sustainably improving the health and livelihoods of 34,000 people by providing water for domestic and productive needs, and leveraging the poverty impact of these water investments through supporting health, livelihoods and environmental activities.

The Building Responsibility for the Delivery of Government Services (BRIDGE) project works with local groups and government agencies to improve their ability to work effectively with the communities they serve in the states of Northern Bahr el Ghazal, Warrap, Unity, Jonglei, and to a limited extent, the Upper Nile.

The Native American Water Improvement Program (NAWIP) is dedicated to building the capacity of three Oklahoma-based Native American tribes to build and manage water and wastewater infrastructure more effectively.

Winrock has played a key technical and knowledge transfer role in sustainable bioenergy development for more than two decades. Our experts in forestry, agriculture, clean energy, enterprise development, and governance create the interdisciplinary teams needed to ensure that bioenergy delivers sustainable outcomes.

Winrock International’s work with smallholder farmers in Asia, Africa and Latin America focuses on improving productivity and incomes.

Fertilizer and manure containing phosphorus help crops grow, but when phosphorus runs off into surface water it can lead to algal blooms and dead zones, damaging water quality for people and wildlife. Current conservation programs aim to reduce water pollution, but do not quantify reductions or track water quality improvements.

We’ve got a better idea: reward farmers according to science-based outcomes. Download this infographic to learn more about how Pay for Performance works.

The Reducing Phosphorus Loads from Agriculture project is piloting an innovative approach to reducing phosphorus loss from agricultural land by providing flexible, performance-based incentives that benefit both farmers and the environment. This project factsheet contains more information about the project.

In the March 2014 Executive Insights, Devex profiled Winrock President & CEO Rodney Ferguson. The article focuses on his transition from a business background to leading an international NGO. Ferguson discusses his first year at Winrock and shares his vision for the future.

Water system is handed over to villagers

A new water system in Mwiri and Rwinkwavu sectors of the Kayonza district, Rwanda, was officially inaugurated March 17 and will supply clean, safe water for approximately 30,000 people, in addition to several schools, health centers and a major District hospital. The system is expected to decrease water prices and villagers will now be able to access clean drinking water instead of the pond which they had previously shared with their cattle.