Forests & Natural Resources Management

tree canopy

Practical approaches to natural resource management are key to rural development, biodiversity conservation and improved human capital. Winrock works in some of the most fragile areas and richest forests on earth, employing strategies to natural resource management that integrate good governance with solid applied science. Winrock works with communities and governments to foster fair resource use, incentives for sustainable land use, and alternative income strategies to reduce pressure on natural resources.

The 21st United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP 21) that took place in Paris in December 2015 resulted in a historic agreement. 195 nations agreed to combat climate change and introduce actions and investment towards a low carbon, resilient and sustainable future.

Paris is the City of Light, and of love. And of a dozen TV shows in prime time where panelists argue about books. Seriously — a dozen. Paris just faced one of its most momentous challenges to French culture and values in the coordinated attacks on cafes and a soccer stadium and a concert hall. Now it is under assault again — by 40,000 delegates from 195 countries — which include not only country leaders and diplomats, but representatives from advocacy groups, the private sector and analytic experts all attempting to find just barely enough common ground to fill, say, 20 pages of agreed-upon framework text.

The latest round of U.N. climate change negotiations is quickly approaching. This round represents a significant milestone because it is the deadline for reaching a new international climate agreement. Winrock International is gearing up to actively engage — hosting sessions on the importance of forest degradation, as well as low emission development and land use. Winrock staff have been invited to speak at a number of additional side events to share their work and views on topics such as REDD+ and INDCs, standard setting, reference levels, and private sector finance in REDD+.

With funding from USAID, and in partnership with Winrock International, Conservation International undertook biodiversity surveys of Prey Lang between June 2014 and February 2015, in cooperation with the Forestry Administration of Cambodia. The objectives of the survey were to determine the biodiversity values and conservation priorities within Prey Lang, identify threats, and produce recommendations for the alleviation of these threats. The survey covered vegetation, mammals (including a specific study of bats), birds, amphibians and reptiles. This is the final report with the results from the surveys.

Prey Lang is one of Cambodia’s most significant unprotected landscapes, and in 2014 the Forestry Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia requested a survey be undertaken to assess the areas’ biodiversity. With funds from USAID, and in partnership with Winrock International, Conservation International coordinated a team of Cambodian and international specialists to survey the type, abundance and diversity of the flora and fauna of Prey Lang.

The Supporting Forestry and Biodiversity (SFB) Project aims to improve conservation and governance of priority forest landscapes to mitigate climate change and conserve biodiversity. The program helps improve the effectiveness of government and other key natural resource managers to sustainably manage forests. It also promotes community participation in forest management decisions.

The USAID Bangladesh Climate Resilient Ecosystems and Livelihoods (CREL) project is working to scale-up and adapt successful co-management models to conserve vital lands, improve governance of natural resources and biodiversity, and increase resilience to climate change through improved planning and livelihoods diversification.

The Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forest (USAID LEAF) program is working to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry-land use sector.

The Vietnam Forests and Deltas program supports community-level action planning to empower community members to identify risks and to take action for improving long-term climate change resilience; the program also engages local, provincial and national-level stakeholders to build capacity to address long-term climate change risks across provinces in each delta.

The Tibetan Sustainable Environmental Resources for Increased Economic Growth (TSERING) program preserves cultural traditions and promotes sustainable development and environmental conservation in in the Tibet Autonomous Region and other Tibetan communities in China.

The 21st United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP 21) that took place in Paris in December 2015 resulted in a historic agreement. 195 nations agreed to combat climate change and introduce actions and investment towards a low carbon, resilient and sustainable future.

With funding from USAID, and in partnership with Winrock International, Conservation International undertook biodiversity surveys of Prey Lang between June 2014 and February 2015, in cooperation with the Forestry Administration of Cambodia. The objectives of the survey were to determine the biodiversity values and conservation priorities within Prey Lang, identify threats, and produce recommendations for the alleviation of these threats. The survey covered vegetation, mammals (including a specific study of bats), birds, amphibians and reptiles. This is the final report with the results from the surveys.

Prey Lang is one of Cambodia’s most significant unprotected landscapes, and in 2014 the Forestry Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia requested a survey be undertaken to assess the areas’ biodiversity. With funds from USAID, and in partnership with Winrock International, Conservation International coordinated a team of Cambodian and international specialists to survey the type, abundance and diversity of the flora and fauna of Prey Lang.

The Support to Ethnic Tibetans in China program is designed to promote development of sustainable livelihoods, environmental conservation, and cultural preservation in Tibetan communities in the Tibetan Autonomous Region and other Tibetan regions of China.

In 2014, Winrock’s John D. Rockefeller 3RD Scholars Program held a competition for applied research concepts to assess the current value of mangrove ecosystem services in the Sundarbans of Bangladesh, as well as changes that are likely to occur due to climate change and other impacts. This is a summary of the team that was commissioned under the USAID-funded Climate-Resilient Ecosystems and Livelihoods (CREL) project.

Paris is the City of Light, and of love. And of a dozen TV shows in prime time where panelists argue about books. Seriously — a dozen. Paris just faced one of its most momentous challenges to French culture and values in the coordinated attacks on cafes and a soccer stadium and a concert hall. Now it is under assault again — by 40,000 delegates from 195 countries — which include not only country leaders and diplomats, but representatives from advocacy groups, the private sector and analytic experts all attempting to find just barely enough common ground to fill, say, 20 pages of agreed-upon framework text.

The latest round of U.N. climate change negotiations is quickly approaching. This round represents a significant milestone because it is the deadline for reaching a new international climate agreement. Winrock International is gearing up to actively engage — hosting sessions on the importance of forest degradation, as well as low emission development and land use. Winrock staff have been invited to speak at a number of additional side events to share their work and views on topics such as REDD+ and INDCs, standard setting, reference levels, and private sector finance in REDD+.

ARLINGTON, Va. (April 2, 2014) — Researchers at Winrock International have developed a first-of-its-kind method for estimating carbon emissions from forest degradation caused by selective logging in tropical regions. Refined over a period of 15 years and tested in six countries, the approach is highlighted in an article authored by Winrock’s Ecosystems Services experts, Timothy Pearson, Sandra Brown and Felipe Casarim — published April 1 in Environmental Research Letters.

Robyn McGuckin profile photo

ARLINGTON, Va. (March 17, 2014) — Winrock International announced today that Robyn McGuckin will become the organization’s new Vice President of the Environment group. McGuckin will lead Winrock programs in clean energy, ecosystem services and forestry & natural resource management, as well its American Carbon Registry unit.

Visiting the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam on Dec. 15, U.S. State Secretary John Kerry, spoke of the cooperation of the United States and Vietnam to "strengthen Vietnam’s resilience to the effects" of climate change. In his remarks, Kerry announced "an initial commitment of $17 million for USAID’s Vietnam Forest and Deltas Program" — a program being implemented by Winrock Interational.