Climate Change

clouds

As the effects of climate change become more apparent, addressing it becomes more urgent. Winrock offers expertise in sustainable agriculture, Payment for Environmental Services, and the design and implementation of carbon measurement and monitoring for mitigation activities. We also operate the American Carbon Registry to incentivize transformative emissions reductions, and help communities generate income from activities such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD).

This paper identifies areas of cooperation that will help companies achieve their sustainability goals and support countries’ need to lower emissions from land use.
 

The 21st United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP 21) that took place in Paris in December 2015 resulted in a historic agreement. 195 nations agreed to combat climate change and introduce actions and investment towards a low carbon, resilient and sustainable future.

The tension between environmental and economic priorities has existed since the very first environmental concern was raised, and is one of the key issues at the heart of international and domestic climate policy.

Paris is the City of Light, and of love. And of a dozen TV shows in prime time where panelists argue about books. Seriously — a dozen. Paris just faced one of its most momentous challenges to French culture and values in the coordinated attacks on cafes and a soccer stadium and a concert hall. Now it is under assault again — by 40,000 delegates from 195 countries — which include not only country leaders and diplomats, but representatives from advocacy groups, the private sector and analytic experts all attempting to find just barely enough common ground to fill, say, 20 pages of agreed-upon framework text.

The latest round of U.N. climate change negotiations is quickly approaching. This round represents a significant milestone because it is the deadline for reaching a new international climate agreement. Winrock International is gearing up to actively engage — hosting sessions on the importance of forest degradation, as well as low emission development and land use. Winrock staff have been invited to speak at a number of additional side events to share their work and views on topics such as REDD+ and INDCs, standard setting, reference levels, and private sector finance in REDD+.

The Vietnam Clean Energy Program (VCEP) is a five-year effort to accelerate Vietnam’s transition to climate resilient, low emission sustainable development. VCEP works with the government to reduce poverty, ensure private sector-led growth, as well as energy access and security. The project supports clean energy development by increasing the use of renewable energy technologies and energy efficient practices in the building sector.

The Supporting Forestry and Biodiversity (SFB) Project aims to improve conservation and governance of priority forest landscapes to mitigate climate change and conserve biodiversity. The program helps improve the effectiveness of government and other key natural resource managers to sustainably manage forests. It also promotes community participation in forest management decisions.

The goal of the Advancing REDD+ Policy and Practice program is to strengthen and influence the capacity of practitioners and policymakers on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) in developing countries. Through a series of papers, workshops and facilitated dialogues, Winrock International and the U.S. Department of State will remove barriers to the progress of REDD+ by providing unbiased analysis of pressing REDD+ topics and promoting constructive dialogue among key stakeholders.

The USAID Bangladesh Climate Resilient Ecosystems and Livelihoods (CREL) project is working to scale-up and adapt successful co-management models to conserve vital lands, improve governance of natural resources and biodiversity, and increase resilience to climate change through improved planning and livelihoods diversification.

The Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forest (USAID LEAF) program is working to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry-land use sector.

This paper identifies areas of cooperation that will help companies achieve their sustainability goals and support countries’ need to lower emissions from land use.
 

The 21st United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP 21) that took place in Paris in December 2015 resulted in a historic agreement. 195 nations agreed to combat climate change and introduce actions and investment towards a low carbon, resilient and sustainable future.

Streck, C., Murray, B., Aquino, A., Durschinger, L., Estrada, M., Parker C., and Zeleke, A. 2015. “Financing Land Use Mitigation: A Practical Guide for Decision-Makers.” Prepared with support from cooperative agreement # S-LMAQM-13-CA-1128 with U.S. Department of State. This report serves as a practical guide for those seeking finance to implement specific actions to reduce emissions from land use. It is intended to assist national policymakers and other decision-makers in accessing and leveraging financial mechanisms to support activities that reduce forest GHG emissions and increase forest carbon stocks.

A publication of the USAID Supporting Forests and Biodiversity Project exploring conservation success in the Eastern Plains and Prey Lang Landscapes of Cambodia, including project success stories from July through December 2014.

In Indonesia, agriculture — particularly the food-crops sector — is extremely susceptible to climate variability and change. In order to improve resilience to climate shocks and ensure sustainable crop yields, the John D. Rockefeller 3RD Scholars Program of Winrock International commissioned a multi-disciplinary research team to develop a rainfall model that would provide extension agents and farmers with detailed information on rice planting times and yields. This is a summary of the research team's major findings.

The tension between environmental and economic priorities has existed since the very first environmental concern was raised, and is one of the key issues at the heart of international and domestic climate policy.

Paris is the City of Light, and of love. And of a dozen TV shows in prime time where panelists argue about books. Seriously — a dozen. Paris just faced one of its most momentous challenges to French culture and values in the coordinated attacks on cafes and a soccer stadium and a concert hall. Now it is under assault again — by 40,000 delegates from 195 countries — which include not only country leaders and diplomats, but representatives from advocacy groups, the private sector and analytic experts all attempting to find just barely enough common ground to fill, say, 20 pages of agreed-upon framework text.

The latest round of U.N. climate change negotiations is quickly approaching. This round represents a significant milestone because it is the deadline for reaching a new international climate agreement. Winrock International is gearing up to actively engage — hosting sessions on the importance of forest degradation, as well as low emission development and land use. Winrock staff have been invited to speak at a number of additional side events to share their work and views on topics such as REDD+ and INDCs, standard setting, reference levels, and private sector finance in REDD+.

John Kadyszewski, left, helps design carbon offset rules for China with the Panda Standard Technical Committee.

Winrock International applauds President Xi Jinping on China’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through market-driven mechanisms and financing to support poorer countries. Winrock has a long history of creating integrated solutions to the world’s most pressing environmental, agricultural and economic problems, and a unique history of collaborative efforts across China and Asia. These developments not only validate Winrock’s vision but add urgency to its integrated, solutions-based approaches toward increasing prosperity in a sustainable world.

John Kadyszewski, Christiana Figueres, and Rodney Ferguson.

In the August 24, 2015, issue, The New Yorker posits that Christiana Figueres may be "the woman who could stop climate change." In her role as the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Figueres is tasked with persuading the leaders of 195 countries to reduce carbon emissions. A former Winrock board member, Figueres was the Climate Leadership honoree at the American Carbon Registry's 2013 awards ceremony.